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Aphids Really Hate our Light

I have heard from multiple growers who experienced the same outcome. Aphids are on the run in a matter of hours!

My distributor in Colorado approached a dispensary… asked them if they had bugs? He was taken to a room and showed many cannabis clones that were infested with “super bug” aphids. (They had become chemical resistant for the most part.) My distributor told the grower that he could get rid of his aphids in a matter of hours. The grower did not believe that this was possible… and allowed my distributor to set up the lights… because the grower wanted to show up the distributor! Within three hours… the grower saw that the aphids were on the run!

Wanted to share a non-cannabis experience… a greenhouse grower’s (Tuinier Bros.) own words about what he experienced while growing flowers in hanging baskets.

Most of our hanging baskets were infected with aphids.

I situated two of our hanging baskets in the middle of two insect deterrent lights. Within an hour or so I noticed that some of the aphids were leaving the plants in the baskets. Within two days all the plants in the baskets illuminated by the insect deterrent lights were clean of the aphids. When I turned off the lights, the aphids returned. They once again vacated the area when I turned the lights back on.

I kept the lights on for five more days, but no aphids returned.

I spread out the lights and added some more uninfected baskets. Some of the baskets that were in the center of the lights were not being illuminated by the lights. In a sense, I had constructed a protective perimeter around the baskets. None of the aphids returned.

I tried spreading the lights out even further and adding more baskets, but the perimeter was no longer intact, and the aphids returned to the plants that were not illuminated by the lights. My thought is if I had enough lights to make a solid perimeter… all the illuminated baskets, as well as the baskets not illuminated, will not experience returning aphids.

Kristian Sonicksen
Assistant Head Grower
TuinierBros. - MI

For further info check out this link…
https://www.metaphase-tech.com/horticultural_lights/insect_repellent_device_24_45

Stay tuned for more testimonials.

Thanks
Gary
[email protected]

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How do other pests react, such as spider mites and thrips?

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The light repels both the spider mite and the thrips. It may be beneficial to use a sacrificial plant bathed in blue light, to give the insects a place to go. Once they are all collected… just put the sacrificial plant into a garbage bag… smoother them by sealing it… and throw your troubles away.

Thanks
Gary

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Spider mites and thrips are also repelled.

See the link below for a list of all the insects that have been tested… and have been affected positively from the light… some repelled… others attracted. Only one that is not on the list is the fungus gnat… repelled by the light.

https://www.metaphase-tech.com/horticultural_lights/insect_repellent_device_24_45

May be able to get you a light to look at… what state are you in?

Thanks

Gary

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I am in Oregon. I’m straight outdoor, but have a small indoor aspect to overwinter strains for mothers the following spring. Mites inevitably move in when it gets cold enough. I couldn’t provide a review until this winter, but thanks for the offer.

What sort of coverage does the 2 and 4 foot models provide? Do you have them under the canopy lighting upward? How much does each model cost?

Thanks for the info, interesting concept.

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We have a distributor in Oregon. I have copied him, so he can get back to you with pricing.

Reagan Anderson

AgriPure Environmental

Forecasting. Monitor & Control. Remediation of odor & PM

503-764-7602

Reagan is involved with growers in Oregon who are currently using the light to repel Colorado russet mites.

Thanks

Gary

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Have you been experiencing Colorado russet mites there in Oregon? Reagan is getting word that the lights are working very well for the growers who are testing them.

Gary

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I have not, thank goodness!

I have some pretty weak two spotted spider mites on my property. My farm was fallow for at least 15 years before I bought it, the bugs are weak and predators are plentiful due to nobody spraying for pests. I just get a flush of TSSM in my mother plant room between December and January and then I battle them until I can get them outdoors where the predators live.

I don’t spray outdoors so that I don’t kill predators with the pests. I have zero pests problems once the plants are in the ground. Well, the pests are there, but any damage is minor and short lived, it’s a balanced ecosystem.

My strains are old, but clean of serious nasties, and honestly, I fear trying new clones from other farms because of what I could bring in. Maybe this light would be good to use as part of a quarantine system for new plants too?

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I like that idea of using a quarantine system for 3rd party clones brought in. Better safe than sorry!

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I’d be interested to learn this as well @g.sigman.
Also, how to the light affect preditors? We are wanting to use biological pest control and I’m curious if these would fit into that regeme or be counter-productive.

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Good question!

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Easier to get spider mites off the clones by using the light. Place lights under the canopy of the plants. The light forces them to the top of the leaves. Then you can just swab them off.

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The coverage has more to do with whether your plants are infested… or if you are protecting from infestation.
May have to place lights end to end if you have a bad infestation… causing you to use more lights. If you are just creating a barrier… then it is a different arrangement… instead of using lights throughout the grow area… you would only have to cover the perimeter.

Some growers are using the lights on their high risk areas… windows and doors… where they know the insects can get in.

Not sure if light will affect the predators one way or the other. You would have to test to be certain. But if you do not have the pests… then you won’t need the predators anyway.

Thanks
Gary

1 Like