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What’s the difference between ‘homegrown’ and pro

Grow one plant :seedling: to the maximum of its ability then what other factors are at play that could make LP grown better? Better as a saleable product?

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Not sure what you’re asking.
If you grow a plant to it’s full potential then you already have a sellable product.
Just grow more of it .:v:

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Some home growers are certified caregivers, legally, in their area.

As they are doing it in a professional manor and probably getting paid something for their efforts and product, and then they are probably paying taxes on that income, this I would say, is what is needed to be technically considered a pro.

Happy growing,

MacG

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Check out this article:

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“You’re gonna need a bigger scale.”

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A master grower knows how to grow a plant to its maximum potential. Home growers usually do not have the knowledge, time or equipment to provide the best nutrients, best lighting, best air flow, best pest control, best transition to flowering, best flowing lights, best time to harvest, best dry, best cure…there are a LOT of factors that go into maximizing a plant’s potential.

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I didn’t really read into question as master grown vs hobby grown. Perhaps my perspective, but I thought this question was directed at one could expect to grow at home vs buy at a dispensary.

Bringing a master grower into question changes things a bit. But the term master grower seems to get thrown around a lot too. Seems a lot of times that’s decided by a hiring manager who may not know anything about cannabis cultivation. Meanwhile someone with much more experience and knowledge who is perfectly content growing for themselves out of his/her home could be dismissed as a hobbyist grower.

Could be a semantics, but best weed I’ve had didn’t come from a dispensary, someone that’s written books, or has a popular YouTube channel.

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Cannabis cup winners were grown way before dispensaries existed.

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I think pro means the same thing it does in any industry.

It is never specifically about quality. Although a certain level of quality is needed to compete in a professional market, matching or exceeding what is “average” at the least. And the most important thing defining a pro is if the person being referred to as a pro is someone who is paid for the service or preformance.

Being paid “under the table”, or illegally selling your product to others on the “black market”, if you will, is not professional.

That doesn’t mean someone who isn’t a pro is not capable of producing a better product than the pros. And as has been mentioned, many have been the best growers well before there was a “professional” market.

Happy growing,

MacG

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True dat. Does that mean you have to win a cannabis cup to be a professional? Or more like macg explains?

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@dbrn32, I feel our experience in the paintball industry is a good parallel to compare. The best players were not necessarily the pros. Eventually many of them would go on to join pro teams. But the biggest thing that seperated pro and amature teams was if the team was genuinely fully sponsored by a company in the industry. Again, so the team’s performance is being paid for in free supplies, entry fees and travel expenses to tournaments covered, and even the team members might actually get a salary for being on the team.

Of course in the beginning of the paintball industry, the pro and amature sides of things were a bit more blurred, at least until the industry as a whole became a lot more professional.

~MacG

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I think that’s a great comparison. I went a long time getting my stuff paid for, but I never received a salary to play lol. I’m just not sure I agree with the correlation of master grower and professional grower. There are plenty of professional electricians and plumbers that aren’t really worth a damn, as with any other industry I’m sure. I just think it’s a little silly that one couldn’t be something like a teacher for instance, but grow as good or better weed than someone who worked at a cultivation center.

I may even go as far to say that in some circumstances a home grow could provide as good or better cannabis than a lot of “professionally grown”.

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Agreed, just because a pro is called a master grower doesn’t mean that the person really is a “master” of growing cannabis, and just because a home grower isn’t a pro, doesn’t mean that home grower isn’t a master grower.

~MacG

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Didn’t quite understand your question… when you’ve fully grown a plant it’s ready for use and you can likewise sell it

i think yall getting hung up on “master” and “home” grower…True many home growers know how to grow, but not all home growers. All master or professional growers know how to grow. Simple distinction. Additionally, professional growers have access to equipment most home growers are not willing to invest in. Space as well. So the distinction is simply knowledge coupled with availability of resources. Most home growers cant put 4 1000W HPS lights in a grow room large enough to handle that…

Now, if we are talking about 1 plant, why are we talking about product that can sell? Who grows just 1 plant to sell? The cost of electricity and water and nutrients to maximize yield and potency would not be worth it for 1 plant just to sell (IMO).

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A pro does it as their sole/main means of income. A homegrower, even if a registered caregiver, often has a job and such, and tends to their grow when off work.

To me, that’s the difference.

Just like a home cook vs a professional cook.

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I don’t necessarily think it has to be their sole source of income. But I think it being their primary source of income might be a consideration.

But yes, the key words are that “they get paid for it for a living”, or part of their living, as in it is their “profession” and so they are a professional.

But I pretty much said about the same thing in my original response.

~MacG

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I love this topic… or how I perceive this topic :blush:
I have a thought that says home-growers can grow the best weed. In truth, both sides have their pluses and minuses. A person at a large-scale grow is NOT necessarily a master grower - that is something that needs to be understood from the start (I’ve seen this first hand). A home-grower can do many things a commercial grower cannot… dial-in an operation much more specific and much more detailed, grow plants that do not follow a strict economic bottom line (16 week sativas are impossible to find in ANY dispensary!), pamper the shit out of a plant, make adjustments faster, etc.

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Yeah, I don’t think anybody is saying home growers can’t grow the best quality.

The title question was about what is the difference between being a home grower or a pro.

The following statement seems to imply smaller grows, i.e.

And of course this is where, in other industries, you get things like craft beers. Certainly more control over smaller batches could create a superior end product.

Farmer’s markets are a good example, often the best fruits and veggies come from a local farmer’s market and are far superior to what you can get at the big chain grocers.

Happy growing,

MacG

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