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Moving Between States with Reciprocal Med Cards

My family and business are moving from California to Arizona in a few weeks. We have a good amount of weed from the six plants we grew (we probably have about 6 oz left) this fall, and we’re wondering if we’re allowed to bring it to AZ with us. We have medical cards, and I know that Arizona and California cards are reciprocal, I’m just not sure how the whole “crossing state lines” thing affects it. Does anyone have any info on this topic?

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I’m not a lawyer so take this with a grain of salt but you still likely would fall under Federal guidelines if something were to happen to you involving the law since you are crossing state lines. If you’re near a border, even being close to the border can put you under border control regulations if you’re being stopped for whatever reason. Not sure if Johnny Law is on your side with this one. “Well officer, it was legal weed when I BOUGHT it.” :rofl:

Maybe other more clued in members can respond with more accuracy but seems like a status quo with the fed/state lines being involved.

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Disclaimer: this is NOT to be construed as legal advice.

Any time you and your cannabis cross state lines (medical, recreational, or other), you are in violation of (at the very least) interstate commerce laws, as well as a plethora of federal laws; thereby giving jurisdiction to any federal authority you may encounter on your journey. I know this sounds crazy and ludicrous, and that’s because it is. As Jeff Sessions will gladly remind you, cannabis is still federally illegal. Even traveling with your weed from rec state Oregon to rec state Washington technically is a violation of federal law… it just boils down to enforcement. Is a Trooper in Washington really going to ask you point of purchase for your container of chronic?

So, to answer your question: Yes, but who is going to question it? You have a valid medical card in Cali and authorities here in AZ recognize cards from other states. Your downfall could come from the amount that you have in your possession. Proposition 203 (Arizona Medical Marijuana Act) allows for an valid patient to be in possession of up to 2 and 1/2 ounces of medicine every two weeks. If you were in possession of, say, the six ounces you have left, you would also be in possession of a felonious quantity of cannabis.

Sounds to me like you should call up some herb-loving friends, because you are going to have one mellow going-away party! Hope this helps!

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You beat me to it, was going to offer up some sweet canna coconut oil recipes recipes!

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Cook it, smoke it, share it with friends…just best practice to not cross state lines with it :sunglasses:

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Thanks for all the feedback! A few days ago I called the Arizona chapter of NORML and spoke to who I think was the chair/head and asked him about the situation. Specifically about the border crossing at Yuma. He said that the current directive is for border patrol to refer any MJ incidents to local police. That seems like a trend for feds in these situations, as I’ve heard the same regarding the TSA.

Whatever ends up happening to the weed, someone deserving will get it hahaha. It turned out surprisingly well for us considering we’d never grown any before. Plus, it made the house smell reallllly good for a few months there haha!

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Carrying product from one State to another, even if both have MMJ or Rec laws remains federally illegal so be aware.
Reciprocity only allows the dispensaries in a State you are visiting to honor the MMJ card you have from your home State. If you have moved permanently, apply to comply with the local statutes asap. A Colorado med card and a Washington drivers license will most likely cause issues.

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My ranch lies about 10 miles north of the Mexico border, firmly situated within the United States. I have a federal narcotics and immigration checkpoint through which I cross every time I access the rest of the United States. It’s a strange no-man’s land dotted with la Migra [U.S. Border Patrol]). In spite of the fact I possess a series of state-issued cards that grant me special permission to cultivate and possess medical cannabis, I still am prohibited from bringing my medicine from my ranch to my house or office in Tucson. Strange, huh?

Even within the protected confines of my home state, with legal cards issued by my state government, Uncle Sam routinely reaches into my vehicle and tries to harass me for my medicine. The war isn’t over.

At least when the government STEALS my medicine, the local prosecutor laughs and throws out any pending charges.

Waste of out tax dollars much?

I have learned to just not pass through the checkpoint with my medicine anymore. Sucks.

My recommendation if you reside in a medical-only stat. is to always have a legal card issued by your local state government or similar regulatory body. Protect yourself as best you can.

Stand up for your rights!