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Predatory mites

Predatory mites. Anyone tried them? Interested to hear what folks have experienced.

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Once I discovered predatory mites and started releasing them every few weeks, I never had another problem with mites again. Those and predatory wasps for whitefly control, were all I needed to handle the pest issues.

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Interesting. Are you using a particular species of mite or a mix? Do you know the density of your application? How often do you need to release more mites? Finally have you done the math on cost vesus things like neem oil or other OMRI treatments?

Thanks!

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There are 2 kind that are typically used, a mix is good. The major predator mites commercially available for release are the western predatory mite and Phytoseiulus. Application rates average 2,000 per 3,000 sq. ft.,continually check with a microscope to understand how mite populations decline and eventually the predators move on in search of more food and the two spotted mites can make a comeback if you’re late with a reapplication of predators.
Sprays like neem oil need to cover 100% of all the leaves and stems both sides but that’s really hard to do. No I haven’t done the math, but after personally experiencing a mite infestation, no math was required.

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@richard2 I take it you want to hit the spider mites with a double whammy then. How do you time the spraying with the predatory mite distribution so that you don’t kill your predators too?

Using 2 kinds of spider mites is because one the western predator mite is better at hot and dry and the other, Phytoseiulus is for more humid conditions.
Depending on how you manage your rooms, the ultimate in cost effectiveness is to keep a small hungry population of predatory mites roaming around. If give up an spray anything that kills insects, you would need to start over with your bio-controls.

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