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Insect ID - Can anyone tell me what this is?

Hi All,

I found several of these on my outdoor plants. I don’t really see any obvious damage. There were also several lady bugs on the plants. Are they larvae? I was wondering if they are Ladybug larvae but I have no bases for that.

Thanks in advance for your commnets

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Can you tell us the approximate region you’re growing in? It should help us ID it. When I ID bugs, it helps me if I know where they’re from.

Also, do you have any side angle shots? Profile view of insects can be really informative.

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We are in the Pacific Northwest near the Canadian border in the foothills of a mountain range.

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Also, can you tell how many legs it has? It looks like it’s in a larval or nymph form. And any side photographs would be a huge boon!

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It has 6 legs … I am pretty sure. As far as a side photo … the little guys move very fast but I will see what I can do.

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I am stumped. Call entomology at the U

Anything flying?
Kinda looks like a juvenile case from a whitefly

This is a larval case of a ladybug

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ok… so it’s not a lady bug.

I will try to get more pics.

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Yeah, I was looking at larval lady bugs, and that most certainly is not it.

It almost looks like a wood louse (roly poly), but those have way more than 6 legs. Definitely need more pictures!

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It has bristles, I don’t remember rolly pollies having them.

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Can you tell me where you are finding them on the plant mainly? soil line, undersides of leaves, tops of leaves, only on old/new growth? Also, see if you can find more and see if any are in different stages, that might help as well. Also, the more pictures the better!

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Mealy Bug possibly?

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We need more pictures. But, if you have ladybug larvae I am going to GUESS a ladybug 2 instage.

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I am finding them under leaves and on the stalks. I also believe I have found an adult, but will leave that to people who know more than I to decide.

bug2

bug3

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That “adult” (looks like a nymph or some intermediate stage) looks like some kind of beetle, at first glance. It doesn’t have wings, which means it’s probably not yet an adult. Have you noticed any leaf damage?

Here are a few that might fit the general behavior pattern and body shape:

The general morphology of what I’m seeing matches most beetles, and the mandibles on that second picture are rather unique.

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It’s some type of ladybug?

University of Kentucky entomology page ladybugs

Do you think there is a support group for male ladybugs? The slogan is “They just don’t understand!” I will find the cartoon of this idea. Stolen. :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:

I think this is an Asian Lady Beetle the adult can be a pain in the ass. But, the larval stage are voracious eaters of everything that pesters a plant. I have seen them eat mites and thrips.

I hate to use Wikipedia but there ladybugs page is good https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harmonia_axyridis

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This one is slightly smashed … is there enough to tell what it is?

1314653960099

and another 1314653981681

corresponding leaf damage 1314653984136

Thanks in advance for your advice and knowledge

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The first picture is of one of the funny stone fruit Aphids. Look at aphids of peaches, plumbs, cherries from local state extension. If it is a small infestation below economic risk, ladybug, lace wing nymphs aka aphid Lyons. In areas with higher concentration use an insecticidal soup. Know the pH of your water and buffering. You want to between 6.5 and 7 for soap otherwise the soap curdles and is less than useless. Use soap only in areas with high economic risk. The rest of the areas grade from zero to 5 by square meters, the good bugs are calculated at number score times the desired good bugs need on release. There is a more complex version of the basic formula that is a bug volume calculation. I would have to look up the details. It is the same basic calculation as a tree volume spray calculation, but for bugs. Tomato growers use the volume calculation more accurate bug releases and to calculate bee requirements.

The white spotting adds to my guess. It looks like powdery mildew. Scratch it with a single edge raiser. If it comes off in dusty flakes, it’s powdery mildew. Once you have powder mildew the damage is already done. You can try to control it, but it’s a bit like tilting at windmills. Clean away affected leaves, despose of away from the growing area.

Big explosions of aphids are often symptoms of a more fundamental problem.

From the voices in my head
Ethan kayes

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Chris,
The first photo looks like the pupal stake of the ash whitefly. But, it is not supposed to be in Washington. —>http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/orn/ash_whitefly.htm
The second photo you put up is not an ash whitefly. Don’t know what it is. Try showing the photo to some greenhouse owners in your area.
Regards,
Dennis


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I think you’ve got a few different bugs going on!

The new photos look like some kind of fly or hopper. Those long back legs are indicative of something that likes to munch on plants.

@tamarindotradingco’s advice of going to a local greenhouse is pretty solid. They might know more about these local pests.

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Chris,
Pretty sure (99.9%) what you have in the second photo is a Green Lacewing Larva.
Both green and brown lacewing larvae prey mostly on aphids but also
attack scale insects, mealybugs, leafhoppers, thrips, mites, pear
psylla and many other small sedentary insects. Adults of Chrysopa nigricornis are also carnivorous, but adults of most species feed on aphid honeydew and plant fluids. They are your friend. They are used for pest control. Buy it a beer. http://jenny.tfrec.wsu.edu/opm/displaySpecies.php?pn=670 (Common to the Pacific Northwest.)
Regards,
Dennis

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